This blog is a mess
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Reblogged from i-effed-it-all-up  4,298 notes

i-effed-it-all-up:

u know how sometimes if u eat too much of a certain food you get sick of it

like my mom used to make spaghetti several times a week for YEARS bc it was quick and easy so now im kinda “meh” about spaghetti

you know that feeling??

that’s how i feel about white cis male protagonists

Reblogged from maxkataetet  173 notes

fablesandgables:

Marble statue of a wounded Amazon

Roman, 1st–2nd century A.D.

Marble, H. 203.84 cm (80 1/4 in.) 

Copy of a Greek bronze statue of ca. 450–425 B.C.

In Greek art, the Amazons, a mythical race of warrior women from Asia Minor, were often depicted battling such heroes as Herakles, Achilles, and Theseus. This statue represents a refugee from battle who has lost her weapons and bleeds from a wound under her right breast. Her chiton is unfastened at one shoulder and belted at the waist with a makeshift bit of bridle from her horse. Despite her plight, her face shows no sign of pain or fatigue. She leans lightly on a pillar at her left and rests her right arm gracefully on her head in a gesture often used to denote sleep or death. Such emotional restraint was characteristic of classical art of the second half of the fifth century B.C. 

The original statue probably stood in the precinct of the great temple of Artemis at Ephesos, on the coast of Asia Minor, where the Amazons has legendary and cultic connections with the goddess. The Roman writer Pliny the Elder described a competition held in the mid-fifth century B.C. between five famous sculptors, including Phidias, Polykleitos, and Kresilas, who were to make a statue of a wounded Amazon for the temple. This statue type is generally associated with that contest. [x]

leupagus:

itsxandy:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

sevenpoints:

HE BROUGHT IT ON HIMSELF

I actually found this pretty depressing because when Happy asks her if she’s boxed before, she looks so proud of herself when she says she has, and then he just kind of demeans her response by suggesting that she wasn’t a real boxer, and you see her face just drop

Natasha Romanoff: professional to an extent.

She’s professional the whole way through — Happy is the one who isn’t just stupefyingly unprofessional but vicious in his attempt to punch her when her back was turned.

Literally. He tried to punch a woman he’d just met, before she’d gotten any gloves, before he’d explained anything else to her.  Fuck anybody who thinks that Natasha’s treatment of him (which is so obviously instinct and training, not a desire to humiliate him, unlike his violence toward her) is unprofessional.